I have never met Clarence “Mac” Evans, but I feel like I know him. In 2014, I voiced the younger version of Mac for the D-Day in HD documentary produced by The History Channel. If I were to meet him today, I would shake his hand and simply say “thank you”. I would thank him for the incredible bravery that he and his fellow soldiers showed on that fateful day. It is truly unforgettable.

I was told by the film’s casting director that Mac and I sounded alike. Our cadence and voice would match as my younger voice would blend into his. My role was to repeat lines from the transcript of Mac’s on-camera interviews conducted for the documentary. When actual footage of the invasion was shown, a younger version of Mac, my voice, was used. His words were simple, yet powerful. He was a humble man who didn’t want to garner attention for his heroic sacrifice. It was obvious to me that he hadn’t talked about that day very much. High school history teachers probably spend more time discussing D-Day than Mac Evans. The unfortunate truth is that he lived it and therefore didn’t need to discuss it. Thankfully, he shared his story for The History Channel.

Months after the recording sessions were over, I sat in my living room on D-Day, June 6, and watched the finished product with tears in my eyes. Mac Evans was truly a hero, as were all the young men who were called upon that day. Their first-hand accounts of the events were raw and honest. It stirred me in a way that I never expected. This year marked the 75th anniversary of the event. Several D-Day veterans returned to Normandy and told their stories. As a voice actor and narrator, I have told hundreds of stories. But none have had more of an impact on me than the words of Mac Evans.


Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *